Alcohol by volume

The alcohol by volume shown on a bottle of absinthe.

Alcohol by volume (abbreviated as ABV, abv, or alc/vol) is a standard measure of how much alcohol (ethanol) is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage (expressed as a volume percent).[1][2][3] It is defined as the number of millilitres (mL) of pure ethanol present in 100 mL of solution at 20 °C (68 °F). The number of millilitres of pure ethanol is the mass of the ethanol divided by its density at 20 °C, which is 0.78924 g/mL. The ABV standard is used worldwide. The International Organization of Legal Metrology has tables of density of water–ethanol mixtures at different concentrations and temperatures.

In some countries, e.g. France, alcohol by volume is often referred to as degrees Gay-Lussac (after the French chemist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac),[4] although there is a slight difference since the Gay-Lussac convention uses the International Standard Atmosphere value for temperature, 15 °C (59 °F).

  1. ^ "Lafayette Brewing Co". www.lafayettebrewingco.com. Archived from the original on 2012-02-19. Retrieved 2012-02-04.
  2. ^ "Glossary of whisky and distillation". www.celtic-whisky.com. Archived from the original on 2012-02-12. Retrieved 2012-02-04.
  3. ^ "English Ales Brewery Monterey British Brewing Glossary". www.englishalesbrewery.com. Archived from the original on 2012-02-19. Retrieved 2012-02-04.
  4. ^ "Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778–1850)". chemistry.about.com. Retrieved 2008-07-05.